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newyorker:

From Larissa MacFarquhar’s 2003 Profile of Quentin Tarantino:

“For every monologue he writes about an old movie or TV show, he writes one about European hamburgers or tipping waitresses or eating pork. … The love of minutiae, like the love of pop culture, is a form of nostalgia—a junk-food version of Proust’s madeleine. But, unlike madeleine-nostalgia—nostalgia for a lost world, an unrecoverable childhood—minutiae-nostalgia is nostalgia for a world that still exists, for a life you’re still living.”

Take a look at more classic New Yorker stories about filmmakers.
Photograph by Ruven Afanador

newyorker:

From Larissa MacFarquhar’s 2003 Profile of Quentin Tarantino:

“For every monologue he writes about an old movie or TV show, he writes one about European hamburgers or tipping waitresses or eating pork. … The love of minutiae, like the love of pop culture, is a form of nostalgia—a junk-food version of Proust’s madeleine. But, unlike madeleine-nostalgia—nostalgia for a lost world, an unrecoverable childhood—minutiae-nostalgia is nostalgia for a world that still exists, for a life you’re still living.”

Take a look at more classic New Yorker stories about filmmakers.

Photograph by Ruven Afanador

(Source: newyorker.com)

Dreaming and Experimentation tips for Ruby

Experimentation: One of the most fulfilling things about programming is that you can turn your dreams into reality. The amount of skill you need varies with your dreams, but generally if you want to develop a certain type of application or service, you can give it a try. Most software comes from necessity or a dream, so keeping your eyes and ears open for things you might want to develop is important. It’s even more important when you first get practical knowledge of a new language, as you are while reading this book. If an idea crosses your mind, break it down into the smallest components that you can represent as Ruby classes and see if you can put together the building blocks with the Ruby you’ve learned so far. Your programming skills can only improve with practice

Q: Which Programming Languages to learn?

The problem is that you’re asking the wrong question. If you want to “get into” programming you need to do roughly two things to start.

    1. Find a reason to care. This can be a pet project, 
       a particular question, an application domain, a 
       partner or team you'd like to work with, the desire
       to understand someone's work you admire, etc.

    2. Learn how to think formally as a programmer. This
       is sort of like learning how to code, but it's 
       different from learning any one language.

Why Companies are Not Startups

Why Companies are Not Startups

Originally posted on Steve Blank:

In the last few years we’ve recognized that a startup is not a smaller version of a large company. We’re now learning that companies are not larger versions of startups.

There’s been lots written about how companies need to be more innovative, but very little on what stops them from doing so.

Companies looking to be innovative face a conundrum: Every policy…

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